Moire

Satin-like, semi-transparent 'ripples' represent the accumulations of sap that occur wherever the path of the wood's growth has been restricted (knots or branches, for example).  Moire & Butterflies are always added on the final overglaze as a negative brush technique. Use a size 100 SPALTER or SKUNK brush for best results.

 

01

The painted pattern of the moiré.  This is a positive technique (paint was added), which is not how moirés are painted.  This is for demonstration.

 

02

This is a typical moiré pattern.  See the horizontal, “chatter” marks.   This is a negative technique (glaze is dispersed from the surface)

 

03

I call this the “quack hold”.  Grab the spalter like you are making an impression of a duck’s mouth.

 

04

Grasp the brush so the handle is nestled between your thumb and forefinger. 

 

05

A frontal view.  When making the marks, rotate your fingers like you would on a piano to make the shape of the brush change.

 

06

Here is the brush in use.

 

07

Here is a different type of moiré for fiddleback mahogany.   The skunk brush is used for this technique.   This brush is smaller, has shorter and more compact hair. 

 

08

I love this one! Frosty Mahogany!

Satin-like, semi-transparent 'ripples' represent the accumulations of sap that occur wherever the path of the wood's growth has been restricted (knots or branches, for example). Moire & Butterflies are always added on the final overglaze as a negative brush technique. Use a size 100 SPALTER or SKUNK brush for best results.

  1. The painted pattern of the moiré. This is a positive technique (paint was added), which is not how moirés are painted. This is for demonstration.
  2. This is a typical moiré pattern. See the horizontal, “chatter” marks. This is a negative technique (glaze is dispersed from the surface)
  3. I call this the “quack hold”. Grab the spalter like you are making an impression of a duck’s mouth.
  4. Grasp the brush so the handle is nestled between your thumb and forefinger.
  5. A frontal view. When making the marks, rotate your fingers like you would on a piano to make the shape of the brush change.
  6. Here is the brush in use.
  7. Here is a different type of moiré for fiddleback mahogany. The skunk brush is used for this technique. This brush is smaller, has shorter and more compact hair.
  8. I love this one! Frosty Mahogany!